Monthly Archives: March 2016

SBEoverview

What is Strengths-Based Education?

Research confirms that a student’s success is driven by non-academic factors such as their character, parental support and the level of hope + engagement they feel within school. Districts and schools have generally addressed this by trying to implement point programs (ex. advisory, life skills classes, interventions) in the face of increasing accountability for student performance in core subjects. Thrively is changing this dynamic by introducing a new, holistic approach for student learning. Strengths-Based Education (“SBE”) incorporates social/emotional learning, student career and interest exploration and student-centered learning (or student-directed projects) into a cohesive pedagogy that helps students find relevance in school and life.

Strengths-Based Education is successful when students have:

  • Built a growth mindset;
  • Developed 21st Century Skills and habits;
  • Identified multiple, exciting post-secondary pathways; and
  • Strengthened their social support structures.

These goals can be accomplished when students’ K-12 journey includes a thoughtful implementation of SBE that is truly 360 degrees in nature. In other words, it must proactively include parents, community and out-of-school time. No component of SBE exists by itself. They are inter-related and non-linear.  Thrively enables Strength-Based Education through our platform, taking students, teachers and parents through the entire process.  Our Strength Assessment helps students discover their character strengths and is the starting point for social emotional learning.  Students then identify their interests and career aspirations through our Pathways, Videos and Activities.  Finally, educators turn their students’ interests into true “student centered learning” by facilitating projects.  Explore what Strengths-Based Learning can do for your students at Thrively.

SBEoverview

Get Started With Strengths-Based Education

My Future, My Way

Over two weeks this fall, Joanna Murray led students at Rancho Minerva Middle School in San Diego on an exploration of their strengths and career interests. Her “My Future, My Way” unit opened the eyes of students to exciting future careers.  Thrively represented 2 weeks of her digital discovery elective.  She has graciously offered her unit materials as a resource for educators.

Thrively Reflection: A reflection for students to capture their reaction to the Thrively Strength Assessment.  Click to download.

Thrively Career Interest Exploration: A set of prompts to help students understand their career aspirations.  Get the worksheet.

Final Assignment: A project assignment and rubric for a student presentation where they share what they have learned with peers, parents and teachers.  See the assignment.

Career Exploration Roadmap

A Career Exploration Roadmap

Hi Thrively Community!

My name is Jerry Blumengarten.   You many know me for my website, Cybrary Man, where I’ve curated over 20,000 relevant links for students, teachers, administrators & parents or because on Twitter as @cybraryman1 where I regularly share my resources on many of the chats.  I taught in the New York City schools for 32 years and I have always been passionate about helping kids figure out their interests and careers.  I couldn’t be happier to contribute to the Thrively mission and doing what I can to add to the community!

Career Exploration… Already?

Parents and teachers need to not only talk to children even at an early age or grade but listen to them about their future choices, career options and life as an adult.  We should not wait until a child is in the last year of high school to decide about what they are interested in and their future plans. Learning about why people work, what work is like and the skills needed to be successful will help children on their road to successful futures.  I’ll talk about career exploration in a series of posts starting with my first topic, “self-discovery.”

Self Discovery:

To prepare children for their future we should start by having them do a self-examination and unearth their true interests, values and aspirations. At the elementary and even middle school level children should reflect more on their likes, interests and hobbies to learn more about themselves.  At this time they are starting to uncover their personality traits.  Children need to understand how they got to this point in their lives and begin thinking ahead to where they may be in the future.  So, start with Thrively’s Strength Assessment, this helps students identify their aspirations and interests.  Thrively’s Pathways, Sparks and Activities tabs then allow students to do a deep dive into the specifics of each.