Skip to content
Share your Impact Story

Creative Nourishment – Feed the Hungry

Our scholars are starving. They are literally being starved daily. And their starvation is a direct cause of the very schools that they attend. Now, if I were talking about food, I guarantee that there would be a march/protest/crowd with torches headed to every school, everywhere. But for some reason this starvation goes without much protest, inside and outside of schools.

Our scholars are starving from MalCreativeNurishing! Plain and simple: our scholars have had creativity and creative thinking taught right out of them. The very design of our education systems, with its narrow focus on testing achievement and ‘academic’ progress, has stripped the opportunity for our scholars to express themselves creatively, to explore ideas innovatively, and to look at problem solving through a lens of failing to succeed. We are an educational society of right and/or wrong…no other options apply.

The solution to this epidemic: give scholars opportunities to think creatively, to be kids, to fail, to play…to not be a number, a score, a grade, or a classification on a piece of paper.

How do we, as educators, do this? Find opportunities to bring creative thinking and experiences into the learning day and environment. Whether it is a 30-day 5-minute challenge or full blown Project Based Learning experiences, our scholars deserve it.

It is not easy work…at first, but the pay off is HUGE. Because creative thinking floods dopamine in our brains and  EXPLODES into wonderous things. This ‘reward hormone’ builds confidence and perseverance…deluge the brain with it and it will pay off all day…all month…all year!

This is ALL about allowing our scholars to find their creative streak and to find their joy in learning. Remember CREATIVITY IS NOT INNATE! It is learned and can be developed. Everyone can be creative; just like building muscle we build creativity by practice and doing every day.

What is creativity? The first thing that comes to most minds is the creative arts: painting, dancing, music…. We need to push past this idea that creativity is only the arts. Creativity is EVERYTHING and EVERYWHERE. Every simple thing you do, every minute of the day, takes a choice of creativity. 

In 2016, the godfather of creativity in learning, Sir Ken Robinson defined it this way: the process of having original ideas that have value. It differs from imagination, which is the ability to bring to mind things that aren’t present to your senses. I think of creativity as putting your imagination to work. … You can be imaginative all day long and never do anything.”

In order to inspire this in our scholars we must do one simple thing: understand our own creativity. We all are very well versed at looking at our scholars and understanding their creative drives, their learning styles, what makes them tic, and what engages them but do we ever really look at ourselves…deeply? In order for us to truly bring creativity to our scholars learning experience, we need to deeply reflect on our ‘teaching style’ which is not unlike learning styles. We all have our distinct ‘style’ of serving up learning in our classroom, whether it virtual or in-person. And just as learning styles guide our instruction, teaching styles also influence how we deliver our learning experience. 

IMPORTANT NOTE OF DISCLAIMER: I am NOT, by any means, making fun of our profession. I fall into MANY of these categories, at different times of my career but also at different times of the day. Each of these styles have wonderful benefits and they have their challenges. Celebrate your teaching style. Embrace it. Find your Voice. Be able to laugh at ourselves. Be reflective.

So here it is:

The YOU KNOW WHO YOU ARE Teachers

The Perfect Classroom Teacher: If your classroom is ready for Classroom Beautiful or Classrooms of Instagram…you know who you are.

The Over-Organized Teacher: If you are in love with lamination, color-coordination, labeling, bins, filing cabinets, bulletin boards, and ‘do not touch a thing without asking!” …you know who you are.

The Super Teacher: If your classroom looks like Walt Disney and the best of HGTV had a baby, you have more energy than can be bottled, and loved by every single one of your students…you know who you are.

The Over-Achiever: If you must have your class first at everything! …you know who you are.

Creative Challenge: take a deep breath and allow for the imperfection of creative learning. Start with 5 minutes and let go! Also know that over structure can inhibit creative thinking, so you owe it your scholars. When they have ‘perfection’ modeled for them they begin to feel that perfection is expected of them…preventing the opportunity to grow from failure.

The BOUNCING All Over The Place Teachers

The High-Energy Teacher: if you are a teacher that seems to have more than the energizer bunny. Gone viral in the morning, dancing on the desk by lunch, and filming videos for class tomorrow all before you leave for the day.

The Crazy Teacher: if you have the reputation of being known for expecting the unknown, with a sprinkle of the impossible.

The Cool Teacher: if you KNOW what is cool, on point, on fleck…you teach with Tiktok. You are adored by staff and student, alike.

Creative Challenge: You might be thinking that this is RIGHT up your alley, but you are going to need to push yourself to tone it ALL the way down, just for a few minutes. Your energy is infectious, and it leads to great things but by taking a back seat to your scholars you will let your scholars fine their own high energy, creative minds. You might need to practice this ahead of time, it will be hard at first but worth it!

Kicking it OLD School Teacher

The Know-It-All Teacher: if you have been around the block, done it, seen it all. Not only can you serve it up, you live it. You know ALL the best practices…you might also be the reason staff meeting go longer than they should.

The Get-off-my-lawn Teacher: if you have ever used the phrase “well, back when I started teaching…” or have ever talked about ‘teaching being better back in the day’ before technology (or just about everything) ruin it.

The Drill Sergeant: if your classroom is one step away from a military recruiting office where you might have ‘raised your voice’ once or twice.

The Hell, Fire, and Brimstone Teacher: if the lack of teaching cursive, The Iliad and The Odyssey, the scientific method, and formal debate will be the fall of modern society.

The Tyrannical Teacher: if there is only ONE point of view…yours. If you do not care about what other people think of about education, or for that matter, you.

Creative Challenge: I want you to know that you have permission to let go. Let go of the old ideas, the old routines, and the old habits. Allow yourself to be a scholar again, to let your hair (metaphorically) down. 2-5 minutes a day, that is all and then you can go right back. But I challenge you to do this creative thinking alongside your scholars and see how it feels.

Lead with Fear

The Hard-Ass Teacher: if you demand high standards, setting the bar high, because teaching above everything else is what you do; you have no time to be friends with your students. Respect is earned. Stern does not mean without heart; it just does not show up in your classroom.

The Control Freak Teacher: if every inch or minute of the day is scripted and plan, there are not moments for disruptive questions or varying of the plan. The RIGHT and WRONG of the day.

Creative Challenge: You have a heavy load to carry here. There is a reason you have decided to remove creative thinking out of your day. Maybe, I suggest, that you try this 30-day challenge with just yourself to go through the process and discover your why?

The COVID-19’ers

The Stressed-Out Teacher: We all hit this point in the year, usually November and February. We are human, too! If you are already counting down to summer break.

The Burnt-Out Teacher: if the dark circles under your eyes take spackle to cover, if numbness has replaced joy, if coffee no longer last.

The Forgetful Teacher: if the demands of the day have sucked the memory cells out of your brain. You know where everything is, or should be, but you cannot find anything. If you forget the daily schedule, especially when it has not changed in year.

The Apathetic Teacher: if you were once the Cool Teacher, or Fun Teacher, or Crazy Teacher but the stress of it all have made you give up inside.

Creative Challenge: OK, we are ALL here. For this reason, alone, we all the perfect teachers to do this work. We need to rediscover the Joy and Creativity of teaching, the reason we are all here. Find a group of teachers feeling the same way and start a ‘creative classroom challenge’ for just you! Find and spark your joy again.

Gives TOO Much

The Suck-Up Teacher: if you LIVE for the moment when other see you teaching, especially the principal. If your students look at you like “who are you?” when someone walks into the room because the honestly do not recognize the teacher you have just become in front of them.

The Highly Concerned Teacher: if you care deeply ABOUT EVERYTHING! If your students know they can get you off topic by asking about…well, just about anything but the curriculum.

The Heartfelt Teacher: if you have ever cried during Read Aloud. If you lose sleep at night thinking about ALL of your students. If all your student, past and present, are ‘your babies!’

The Supercoach: if you are a Rockstar teacher and love to share your experience. If you can explain how to do something and come into a classroom the next day to do a demo. If you do the same thing with your student. 

The Activist Teacher: if you are the model of ‘the right choices in life’ and make it your mission to ensure that every one of your students KNOWS what to do and what not to do to show improvement in learning and directions in life.

Creative Challenge:  Very much like the ‘Old Schoolers’ you are stuck in routine. Deep rooted routines. Breaking this is going to be a test to your psyche BUT push through it. For your scholars BUT also for you. You might discover a new you inside.

The Outliers 

The Fashionable Teacher: if you spent more than 20 minutes getting ready in the morning, you are always on point in your appearance, you might look at other teachers and wonder if their electricity was working that morning…if the world is crumbling down around you? You will always look like you have it all together.

The Hot Teacher: if student flock to be in your class but retain nothing while there, but they are always staring in engaged, jaw dropped, gazing. 

The Buddy Teacher: Not only a new teacher but newly out of school…super close to their student’s age! More of a bestie than someone your students will look to for learning.

The Shy Teacher: if you are incredible passionate about teaching, have the skills of a master teacher, know every new, researched strategy for inspiring learning…and no one knows it.

Creative Challenge: You are in the best boat to do this work. You already have your scholar’s attention so harness this power…for creative good. Your scholars will do pretty much anything you ask…they won’t even question the why…and will burst with dopamine and creativity in seconds!

The WE HAVE ALL BEEN HERE Teacher

The Talkative Teacher: if people avoid you in the halls, not because they don’t like you but because they know it’s going to be an hour-long conversation, a vortex, but your students have learned to foster this into ‘less time to work.’

The Rebel Teacher: no matter what the principal says needs to be happening in your classroom…it’s never going to happen.

The Late Teacher:  wait, huh? What time is it?!

The Repetitive Teacher: if you take a 5-minute lesson and are able to stretch it out for 30 minutes, reiterating the same ideas in 10 different ways.

The Swimming-in-Papers Teacher: if you have ever hidden a stack of papers under your desk, found a stack at the end of the school year in a cupboard, or just plain have stacks of student work…everywhere.

Creative Challenge: if you fall into this group, it is temporary. I suggest that you dig deep and find your other teaching style above and embrace that other side of you. Except the Swimming in Paper Teacher…if you find the solution please email me…for a friend.

And there is ONE last group that we all think about being or are….
The Test Prepper

The Test Prep Teacher: if your whole goal for the year is that state test score, or your building sores, or just scores. You are praised each school year for achieving the ‘impossible’ and you know the secrets for getting those scores.

Creative Challenge: if you fall into this group you are missing out on a HUGE secret. If you elevate the creative challenges for your students will naturally increase those scores. Creative challenges elevate confidence and develop a problem-solving lens that can’t be taught from a text book or worksheet. AND you and your students can have a blast getting there!

We are our own stumbling blocks to feeding the creativity starvation. Once we discover, embrace, and love our own teaching style, we will explode creativity back into our scholar’s learning. Feed the hungry. Blast the dopamine. Find your joy so you scholars can find theirs. Sing your creative voice so your scholars can join in on the chorus. But most of all: give yourself permission.

Final thought: We’ve looked at a lot of different ‘teaching styles’ and many of these styles may have challenged our idea of what we think teaching looks like. But I’d like to offer up a different type of challenge. I’d like to challenge you to think about a word. It is amazing how much power a single word can have. Take for instance: the word ‘feedback.’ I recently asked for some ‘feedback’ on a presentation I did and the return reply? We don’t give feedback. We only give FEEDFORWARD! The power of changing just one word, one simple way to look at something we all dread. So, I ask you to think about this: let’s honor our title of being a ‘TEACHER’ but let’s rethink the power of a new title. Why? Let’s rethink what we call ourselves. What if we called ourselves GUIDES, or EXPLORERS, or VOYAGERS, or even a PIONEER? Think about it: I am a SCHOLASTIC PIONEER! How are those superpowers now?

Jamie Ewing is a Thrively EdInnovator, Elementary STEM/Science Educator New York City DOE,  2019 Microsoft Innovative Educator, 2020 SpheroHero, Prezi Board of Advisors -Education, 2019 LittleBits BitStar, 2015 Henry Ford Innovative Teacher of the Year, 2014 MOHAI Teacher of the Year, 2013 Academy for Arts and Science National Innovative Teacher of the Year, NSTA Outstanding Science Text Committee 2016-2019, NSTA Nominations Committee

Resources for Creativity
Sir Ken Robinson’s last speech
Test Taking, Creativity and Why Most of Us Are Doing It Wrong
Creativity In The Classroom
4 Ways to Develop Creativity in Students
Learning to Work and Think Like an Artist

Incorporate SEL and interests to develop the whole child

The National Conference of State Legislators (NCSL) explains SEL as “a wide range of skills, attitudes, and behaviors that can affect a student’s success in school and life.” NCSL goes on to say, “critical thinking, managing emotions, working through conflicts, decision making, and teamwork—all of these are the kind of skills that are not necessarily measured by tests but which round out a student’s education and impact his/her academic success, employ-ability, self-esteem, relationships, as well as civic and community engagement.”

In short, SEL is the skill set that teaches children to be productive members of society.  Most teachers can easily list a set of traits or qualities that they hope to see their students exhibit.  These include qualities such as independent thinking, self motivated, inquisitive and persistent.  Thrively takes these skills even further and combines them with students’ interest and strengths to encourage the student’s whole self development.

Finally, teachers have a method to actually teach these desired skills sets in a way that motivates students to learn and achieve them.

What does the research say?

Thrively is backed by lots of science and research. It utilizes several assessments in order to compile a profile and design an individualized instructional path for each student.  The assessments include the THOMAS and MIDAS, in conjunction with their own independently developed Strength Assessment.

The THOMAS assessment is based on the Habits of Mind, which is part of the previously mentioned science and research. The Habits of Mind are an identified set of 16 problem solving, life-related skills, necessary to effectively operate in society and promote strategic reasoning, insightfulness, perseverance, creativity and craftsmanship. The understanding and application of these 16 Habits of Mind serve to provide the individual with skills to work through real-life situations that equip that person to respond using awareness (cues), thought, and intentional strategy in order to gain a positive outcome.

The THOMAS Assessment builds a personality profile of the test taker and combines the 16 Habits of Mind into four main traits, Dominance, Influence, Steadiness, and Compliance.  These traits are known as the DISC personality types.

Alicia Verweij has written an in-depth article; read more https://www.edgeucating.com/help-students-thrive-with

Students Advocate for Authentic Learning

As he planned instruction for his high school English classes, Scott Reindl asked himself, “How is this going to help my students prepare for life beyond my classroom? Will they be able to think critically and collaborate effectively? Will my students be able to differentiate themselves in cover letters, resumes, and interviews? Ultimately, that is what we’re doing; we’re giving students the internal resources to navigate the world on their terms,” explained Reindl. Now, as the Program Administrator for Career Education, Reindl brings the pursuit of student voice, empowerment, and agency to 30,000 students in the Anaheim Union High School District (AUHSD).

The most resounding demonstration of student voice and agency is political action. In 2013, 200 high school students–with 5,000 petitions in hand–went to Anaheim City Hall to appeal for change. They wanted an education that would lay a foundation for a future of their choosing, an education that would capitalize on the resources in their own community to advance their aspirations. Students whose career goals ranged from future naval office to business leader responded to the question: “Does education serve us, or do we serve education?”

“I feel that right now, we are serving education and that’s not the way it should be,” shared aspiring Naval officer, Fabiana Munoz. “Give me the tools I need to succeed in life. Show me how to get to college, pick a career, and come back and contribute to my community,” added aspiring future Anaheim Police Chief, Abel Ardiaz.

Following the student-citizens’ impassioned and articulate pleas for change, Anaheim Mayor, Tom Tait and Anaheim Superintendent, Michael Matsuda partnered with the California State University, Fullerton’s GEAR UP program to launch a model public-private partnership to advance both the needs of young learners and the workforce. Together, they created Anaheim’s Innovative Mentoring Experience (AIME), and since its inception, they’ve created over 9,000 mentoring and internship experiences for students. Funding sponsors the United Way of Orange County and the Disneyland Resort, along with others, have joined the effort and have allowed the program to expand this premiere mentoring and internship program to AUHSD students. In what is surely a model for the nation, AUHSD has transformed their district into a launchpad for a future full of promise and possibility.

Thrively was the right fit for what we’re trying to achieve. All of our students are now taking the Thrively Strengths Assessment, and we’re working together to create virtual work-based learning experiences, or what Thrively calls Business Connections projects, so that every learner in our district has the opportunity to experience real-world problem solving,” explained Reindl.

AUHSD’s commitment to authentic learning is gaining both momentum and attention. This year, Reindl and his team won the prestigious ePrize grant, offered by Chapman University’s Attallah College of Educational Studies, in partnership with the CEO Leadership Alliance of Orange County, which recognized the district’s efforts to prepare the next generation of students for high-growth sectors in the region. Thrively is thrilled to support the successful implementation of this critical work.

Community-Based Organization Responds to Covid Crisis

If you try to park in the lot at the offices of Strengths-Based Community Change (SBCC), don’t expect to find a parking space. SBCC staff and volunteers have commandeered the space to make room for an outdoor classroom. This resourceful team has scrimped, saved, and trimmed to purchase tents, tables, desks, and extension cords to ensure that every child in the community has an opportunity to learn.

In its 45th year of operation, one thing about SBCC remains fixed: an unrelenting drive to adapt to the changing needs of the community. Founded by a trailblazing team of licensed marriage and family counselors, SBCC is now a model for collaborative, community-driven change. Executive Director Colleen Mooney had aspired to be a social worker, and then she discovered SBCC at the Hometown Fair in Manhattan Beach. After a few years of volunteer service, SBCC’s Board of Directors placed Mooney at the helm. She’s been claiming that, while there’s an important place for therapy, healing also happens in families and communities. The evidence? SBCC serves 10,000 families a year in Los Angeles County.

“Community organizing is the cornerstone of our work. As a result, we’ve moved away from offering programs to building community capacity through what we call ‘ventures.’ The three ventures center on community activation, economic vitality, and the capacity to thrive,” explained Mooney. “We are catalyzing a deeper investment in communities through the ventures that we co-create with the residents in the communities we serve,” she added.

“SBCC’s mission is to help residents gain access to power. Access is driven by our belief that every person has gifts and talents and when those are lifted up, families can determine opportunities that make the best use of their talents; they can decide for themselves how to make the best use of their time.” This emphasis on strengths-informed choice is what attracted Mooney to Thrively. The alignment between SBCC and Thrively was clear to Mooney from the start: “Thrively helps young people discover and share their strengths, interests, and aspirations,” said Mooney. “Thrively is a natural fit.”

Thrively Strength Assessment measures students against 23 different strength factors. It also takes an inventory of your students’ career aspirations and their extracurricular interests.

Imagine an entire community where the members value themselves and one another for the internal assets that they bring to the table and where what’s on the table is shared. “When people are on a path to meaningful and values-aligned discovery, they become excited about making a positive impact and the entire community benefits,” emphasized Mooney.

Whether it’s distributing 2,000 grab-and-go meals a day, providing essential self-care products, registering people to vote, or educating children in a safe and welcoming outdoor setting, SBCC and their resident partners are making an impact where it’s needed most. This responsive and flexible approach is supported by the United Way and other values-aligned foundations that believe in the community’s power to drive positive change. Mooney sums up the veracity of this approach: “What we are seeing from residents is that no matter the level of their specific need, they want to help, they want to be of service and give back in whatever way they can. We all feel empowered by these remarkable acts of courage.”

Dropout Prevention Begins with Self-Awareness

With a passion for helping the underdog, Dr. Cynthia Knight has fervently persevered in creating a nonprofit organization to provide quality educational experiences for the most-needy of Iowa’s residents–the high school dropout.

From classroom experiences ranging from large school districts: Des Moines, Johnston and Ankeny, Christian education at Dowling Catholic High School to smaller schools in Iowa: East Marshall, West Marshall to a seven-year stint at the Iowa Department of Education, Dr. Knight listened, learned, and developed a program, Jordahl Academy. “This program has successfully helped students earn a high school diploma who have been told there is no money, they don’t have time to finish, or there are no more options available for them through traditional school environments,” explained Knight. Jordahl Academy, named in honor of Dr. Knight’s friend and mentor, Don Jordahl, who was instrumental in launching this work, has spent the last 9 years changing lives. “We connect students with highly qualified Iowa licensed teachers who are passionate about providing hope to these young people,” she added.

IOWA NET HIGH ACADEMY.jpg

“One of the best tools we have for our work is Thrively. We use Thrively twofold: to get to know our students’ interests/career plans so we can create a learning pathway that is personalized and project-based and to let students explore their interests through the online tools Thrively provides.” When students are engaged and can see the personal relevance in what they are learning, they are more likely to invest their time and see the direct impact their new skills have on their daily and future lives. “100% of our graduates are employed or seeking further education through the trades/college. We are proud of these young people,” Knight added.

Thrively PBL Project-Based Learning

With a servant’s heart, Dr. Knight funds this work through a tea room named after her grandmothers, Ivadel Ruth’s Tea Room, and a consignment shop, Backroom Bargains, and she runs with her husband. She also takes donations from Don Jordahl’s supporters.

More than 4,000 Iowa students have dropped out each year for the past three years. Dr. Knight created another option for these young people. She calls it HOPE.